When it comes to drinking, the term bacchanalian may come to mind. Dionysus is the Greek god of wine also known as Bacchus.  Bacchus, the Roman nicknamed god of festivals and wine (among other things) is one of the few remaining mythological figures consciously celebrated today. While his name is often invoked when it comes to raunchy good times it should also be noted that he was mostly associated with vineyards, liberation, and ultimately wine.

Bacchus god of Wine

Bacchus_Funnel_4577R_1Granted, there were Roman cultists who celebrated Bacchus… a bit too enthusiastically, but this wasn’t the common manner of praising the ancient god. He was regarded as a teacher and liberator, sharing his knowledge of vines (and their eventual journey in becoming wine) as well as hosting parties that encouraged people to shed inhibitions and speak truth to one another.

Naturally, over the course of a couple millennia that tradition has warped into compromising footage at during spring break and regrettable ‘drunk dialing’ – all attributed to Bacchus or bacchanalian excess. Of course, along with the more excessive connotations of this god, there is a demand for pieces that feature an image of the infamous god. This is most prevalent in wine accessories.

 

Wine lovers all over can display their appreciation for the bacchanalian myth with wine stoppers, wine pourers, drip rings, and coasters showcasing a carved face of the bearded god. There’s also the very appropriate wine funnel which decants wine through the mouth of Bacchus as you pour it into your decanter – an excellent way to start a conversation about the origins of Bacchus and how his myth as evolved (or devolved) over the centuries.

Bacchus_bottle_stoppersBacchus_wine_coaster